Paid leave – Satgtu http://satgtu.org/ Wed, 25 May 2022 09:47:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://satgtu.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-24T184312.205-150x150.png Paid leave – Satgtu http://satgtu.org/ 32 32 Lewiston Rep. Cloutier: The state budget invests in programs and services hard-working Mainers deserve https://satgtu.org/lewiston-rep-cloutier-the-state-budget-invests-in-programs-and-services-hard-working-mainers-deserve/ Wed, 25 May 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://satgtu.org/lewiston-rep-cloutier-the-state-budget-invests-in-programs-and-services-hard-working-mainers-deserve/ Mainers works hard: at our jobs, for our families and to support our communities. As a state legislator, I think it’s only fair that our state government works just as hard to make sure the people of Maine have the tools they need to build financial security, give their children a bright future and retire […]]]>

Mainers works hard: at our jobs, for our families and to support our communities. As a state legislator, I think it’s only fair that our state government works just as hard to make sure the people of Maine have the tools they need to build financial security, give their children a bright future and retire with dignity.

It has been an honor to serve on the Legislature’s Budget Drafting Committee for the past two years, and I am proud to share that the recently enacted Supplementary Budget pays tribute to the hard work of everyday Mainers. We have invested the necessary resources in services that provide our residents with the support they need, when they need it. The budget also makes critical investments in the future of our state by investing in our youth and honoring our older residents by improving their retirement benefits. Furthermore, I am proud to share that we passed this budget with overwhelming bipartisan support.

To help with the rising cost of living, we are providing immediate relief to working families. The supplementary budget increases the value of Maine’s earned income tax credit by an average of $400 per family, which is expected to provide relief to 100,000 families, mostly households with incomes below $57,414. The budget also provides substantial property tax relief for Mainers by increasing the maximum benefit of the Equity Property Tax Credit. Those who pay more than 4% of their household budget in property taxes or rent will be eligible for a refundable tax credit of up to $1,000 per year, and seniors may receive $1,500.

We’ve also funded efforts to move Maine toward adopting a paid vacation program. When babies are born, older parents need help, or a family member falls ill, workers in Maine deserve to be able to take time off without financial penalty. As House Chair of the Commission to Develop a Paid Family and Medical Leave Benefits Program, I am proud that the recent budget funds our efforts to continue to develop policy recommendations to create a strong program for working people. of Maine. With this additional funding, I hope our commission will be able to design a program that future legislators can adopt.

To support Maine’s future, we’ve funded major efforts to uplift young people, stabilize school funding, and make continuing education after high school more affordable. The supplementary budget provides two years of free community college for recent high school graduates; fully funds school meals; expands Children’s Health Insurance to provide coverage for 40,000 more Maine children; rebuilds the school-based oral health program and prevents tuition hikes in the University of Maine system.

To help Mainers retire with dignity, we have funded measures to support their financial security. The budget exempts the supplementary retirement pension from income tax, improving the deduction for retirees from $10,000 to $25,000 for the 2022 tax year, to $30,000 for the tax year 2023 and $35,000 for tax years 2024 and beyond. This will provide retirees with an average tax reduction of $560 in 2022, and by tax year 2025 the average reduction will be approximately $795. We have also strengthened pension benefits for retired civil servants by improving their cost-of-living adjustments. This will help those who have spent their lives serving others to cope with rising costs.

This is just the tip of the iceberg in terms of how the supplemental budget invests in the programs and services Mainers need and deserve. From providing financial assistance to Mainers to investing in education and retirement so our youngest and oldest residents can thrive, this budget will serve people in every corner of our State in the immediate future and in the years to come. It has been an honor for me to work alongside my colleagues in the Legislative Assembly to craft this budget, and it has been a privilege to play a role in improving the lives of working people in our state.


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New parliament must address paid parental leave https://satgtu.org/new-parliament-must-address-paid-parental-leave/ Sat, 21 May 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://satgtu.org/new-parliament-must-address-paid-parental-leave/ Paid parental leave supports critical public health benefits, giving women a chance to recover from childbirth, bond with their children, and develop a breastfeeding pattern, all of which has positive health outcomes. child health. Loading But policies that don’t encourage shared caregiving mean other parents are missing out on the crucial chance to bond with […]]]>

Paid parental leave supports critical public health benefits, giving women a chance to recover from childbirth, bond with their children, and develop a breastfeeding pattern, all of which has positive health outcomes. child health.

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But policies that don’t encourage shared caregiving mean other parents are missing out on the crucial chance to bond with their children and establish habits of shared caregiving and household chores that will last a lifetime.

Many large companies, including Telstra, Swinburne University and Norton Rose Fulbright, recognize the value that fairer paid parental leave can bring to workplaces and are making the change.

We call on the next parliament to adopt a gender-neutral six-month paid parental leave to encourage shared custody by both parents.

We would also like to see a commitment to fight stigma and normalize men who take parental leave to be actively involved in the lives of their children, which our research shows they benefit from.

These reforms must be supported by high-quality, accessible and affordable childcare services that better enable women to participate in the labor force and thrive in the workplace.

Doing so requires shifting our collective view of parental leave from a career change to a critically important time for all parents to bond with their children during the most critical stage of their lives.

Employers are playing a crucial role in redesigning policies to bridge the gap between what is available to Australian parents and international best practice.

Iceland’s decision to extend leave periods for both parents and drastically reduce portable leave has led to more fathers taking more leave in the first few months after becoming parents.

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In the first year after QBE Insurance began offering 12 weeks of paid parental leave to each new parent, with two weeks taken after the birth of their child and then a set number of days per week over the following months, it has seen a 300% increase in the number of men. take a vacation.

Incorporating caring and flexibility for both men and women removes career barriers, makes companies more gender equal, and supports workforce mental health that drives performance.

Reforms can trigger the cultural shift that allows fathers to better understand caregiving by promoting shared caregiving and creating more equal relationships that allow children to see their parents in different roles.

Additional furlough provisions could cost the government more in the short term, but would increase household incomes and support economic growth by keeping women working and solving nationwide staffing shortages.

Engaging women in paid work at the same rate as men would provide most of the 1.2 million workers the National Skills Commission estimates Australia needs by 2026 and halve the labor force participation gap. the workforce between men and women would fill record vacancies.

It would also be a win for small and medium-sized businesses, which employ two in three Australians but are less able to fund equal pay parental leave.

It’s easy to see how better paid parental leave could make us all winners.

Lisa Annese is CEO of Diversity Council Australia.

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Minjarez targets Sakai for ruling on paid sick leave https://satgtu.org/minjarez-targets-sakai-for-ruling-on-paid-sick-leave/ Fri, 20 May 2022 00:08:21 +0000 https://satgtu.org/minjarez-targets-sakai-for-ruling-on-paid-sick-leave/ Peter Sakai wants Democratic second-round voters to think about his 26-year court career as they walk into the voting booth and vote for Bexar County Judge. State Rep. Ina Minjarez, Sakai’s opponent, also wants Democratic voters to think about Sakai’s court career. Not necessarily the fact that Sakai was the county’s first-ever juvenile court judge. […]]]>

Peter Sakai wants Democratic second-round voters to think about his 26-year court career as they walk into the voting booth and vote for Bexar County Judge.

State Rep. Ina Minjarez, Sakai’s opponent, also wants Democratic voters to think about Sakai’s court career.

Not necessarily the fact that Sakai was the county’s first-ever juvenile court judge. Not necessarily the work he’s done to improve the county’s foster care system or address domestic violence.

Minjarez identifies a decision Sakai made in November 2019, near the end of his 15 years as a district court judge.

Nine days before San Antonio’s paid sick leave ordinance took effect, Sakai issued a temporary injunction preventing it from taking effect.

This decision is the focus of a new direct mail piece from Minjarez.

“Peter Sakai has betrayed working families,” the mailer says.

The other side of the ad features an image of an elderly woman sitting in a chair. The photo is accompanied by the following message: “We have paid Peter Sakai’s paid sick leave benefits. He stole ours! »

The Mail asks Democratic voters to consider this question: “If he can’t do the right thing on the bench, how can we trust him to be our Bexar County judge?”

We probably should have seen it coming. As with most primary races, there isn’t much daylight between Sakai and Minjarez on political matters. Any difference, real or perceived, tends to be magnified.

But the issue of paid sick leave slipped back into our collective backsight a few years ago and hasn’t featured much in policy debates since then.

In early 2018, Working Texans for Paid Sick Time, an alliance led by the Texas Organizing Project (TOP), collected more than 140,000 signatures for a paid sick leave initiative during the November ballot in San Antonio.

The decision caused considerable heartburn at City Hall, as the sick leave crusade coincided with a push by the San Antonio Professional Firefighters Association to secure three charter amendments on the ballot. vote that would weaken the power of the city government.

Mayor Ron Nirenberg was concerned that the expected surge in participation in paid sick leave would boost the prospects for firefighter initiatives. He and the council got around that pickle by passing its own paid sick leave ordinance.

The order – requiring companies to give employees one hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours worked – was passed under duress by council members who believed it would never be implemented. (The speculation at the time was that the Texas Legislature would pass a bill in 2019 to override all municipal paid sick leave orders in the state. That did not happen.)

A coalition of local businesses eventually challenged San Antonio’s order, and it landed in court in Sakai.

There are some key points to consider when evaluating his decision.

For one thing, even some of the ordinance’s public supporters privately believed that it violated Texas minimum wage law by reducing workers’ hours, not reducing their pay.

Also, Sakai’s injunction put the order on hold, but did not kill her. This happened later, when the Democratic-dominated 4th Court of Appeals struck him down.

Paid sick leave orders in Austin and Dallas also ended up being blocked by the courts.

In an interview Thursday, Sakai described the Minjarez shipper as a “false” and “misleading” interpretation of his actions.

He said his decision was not a political statement, but an action based on a strict reading of the law.

“What I did was hear a dispute between two parties and then make a decision based on the legal arguments made by both parties,” Sakai said.

“That was the essence of my decision. And it allowed the case to proceed to appellate review, to determine the validity and constitutionality of that order.

Sakai said he personally supports paid sick leave for workers, but added: “My role back then was that of a judge. My opponent is a lawyer and she should have understood that.

Minjarez’s campaign hit back with a statement saying, “Judge Sakai is touting his 26-year record. His decision on paid sick leave is a key element of this case. He had the opportunity to do the right thing, to stand up for the courage of his convictions and he didn’t.

Sakai’s court ruling played a part in TOP’s decision to endorse Minjarez. But that didn’t deter the AFL-CIO from backing him.

The key question now is whether Minjarez’s mail will turn more Democratic voters against the target of the attack or the candidate who delivered it.

ggarcia@express-news.net | Twitter: @gilgamesh470

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Paid family and domestic violence leave on political agenda after Fair Work Commission ruling https://satgtu.org/paid-family-and-domestic-violence-leave-on-political-agenda-after-fair-work-commission-ruling/ Tue, 17 May 2022 07:02:37 +0000 https://satgtu.org/paid-family-and-domestic-violence-leave-on-political-agenda-after-fair-work-commission-ruling/ Unions and advocates are calling on the next federal government to give all workers access to 10 days of paid and domestic violence leave, following the landmark Fair Work Commission ruling on the issue. Key points: The Fair Work Commission has backed 10 days of paid family and domestic violence leave for rewarded workers The […]]]>

Unions and advocates are calling on the next federal government to give all workers access to 10 days of paid and domestic violence leave, following the landmark Fair Work Commission ruling on the issue.

The Fair Work Commission has given its principled support for changing rewards for about 2.3 million workers to include annual entitlements to 10 days of paid family and domestic violence (FDV) leave.

“Paid FDV leave provides significant relief to those experiencing FDV,” the full commission concluded in its landmark decision released on Monday.

“This leave helps individuals maintain their economic security, access relevant services, and transition safely to a life free of violence.”

Currently, workers are only entitled to five days of unpaid leave.

In a dismissal of concerns expressed by business groups, the commission said uptake of the 10 days of FDV paid leave would likely be low, “suggesting that these costs are unlikely to be substantial”.

“Employers are already paying for the cost of FDV – due to increased absenteeism and lost productivity. FDV paid leave will help reduce this cost,” the FWC said.

The interim decision applies to full-time and part-time employees.

But the FWC rejected pressure from the Australian Council of Trade Unions for paid FDV leave to apply to casual workers.

This is despite the fact that the FWC pointed out in its ruling that female victims of family and domestic violence have more troubled work histories and were more likely to be employed on a casual or part-time basis than women with no experience of violence. .

Advocates and unions are calling for paid family and domestic violence leave to be extended to all employees, including casuals and contractors.

“Many women are in low-paying and precarious jobs,” said Helen Campbell, chief executive of Women’s Legal Service New South Wales.

“We know that financial security is very important to contribute to a path to security.”

Dr Kate Seymour, senior lecturer in social work at Flinders University, said this was a critical shortcoming.

“Increasingly, work is precarious and that has implications at all levels,” she said.

“As important as Fair Work’s decision is as a recognition of the extent of family and domestic violence, the hope is that it would be extended to more people.”

The Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU) has also called on the next Federal Government to extend paid family and domestic violence leave to all workers covered by National Employment Standards (NES).

The NES covers an additional 8.4 million workers.

“Already this year, 18 women have been killed by their current or previous partner. Access to paid family and domestic violence leave saves lives. No worker should ever have to choose between their income and their security,” said ACTU President Michele O’Neill.

“The difference between this right in the reward system and the NES cannot be overstated. Not including it in the NES would deny access to it to millions of workers.”

Major parties reimburse paid leave but policy details unclear

Labor has previously said it backs 10-day paid leave but failed to meet a deadline set by the CBA to provide further details of party policy.

The Coalition previously voted against Labor’s pressure in the Senate to include 10 days of paid leave, as it said the Fair Work Commission was looking into the matter.

In a statement, a spokesperson for Industrial Relations Minister Michaelia Cash welcomed the FWC’s decision.

“We will consult with relevant stakeholders, in particular family and domestic violence advocacy groups and small business employers, on its implications,” the statement said.

“If re-elected, we will submit a submission to the Fair Work Commission in accordance with the process established by the Fair Work Commission.”

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Goldman’s top brass are entitled to unlimited vacation while juniors are entitled to two extra paid days off https://satgtu.org/goldmans-top-brass-are-entitled-to-unlimited-vacation-while-juniors-are-entitled-to-two-extra-paid-days-off/ Sun, 15 May 2022 17:17:36 +0000 https://satgtu.org/goldmans-top-brass-are-entitled-to-unlimited-vacation-while-juniors-are-entitled-to-two-extra-paid-days-off/ Sunday, May 15, 2022 6:02 PM Caps on the number of paid vacation days associated and managing directors of the Wall Street titan were scrapped earlier this month as part of a new ‘flexible vacation’ policy Goldman Sachs top brass are entitled to as much vacation time as they want, while junior staff were only […]]]>

Sunday, May 15, 2022 6:02 PM

Caps on the number of paid vacation days associated and managing directors of the Wall Street titan were scrapped earlier this month as part of a new ‘flexible vacation’ policy

Goldman Sachs top brass are entitled to as much vacation time as they want, while junior staff were only given two extra days of annual leave, an internal memo revealed.

Caps on the number of paid vacation days associated and managing directors of the Wall Street titan were scrapped earlier this month under a new “flexible vacation” policy.

The news was first reported by The Telegraph.

The move stands in stark contrast to Goldman’s historic reputation for having one of the most intense work cultures on Wall Street.

Companies are trying new incentives to attract and retain staff in a tight job market in the financial services sector.

Last year, a group of junior corporate bankers went viral after slides of a presentation to senior executives were leaked pleading with them not to work more than 80 hours a week.

“As a company, we are committed to providing our employees with differentiated benefits and offerings to support wellbeing and resilience,” the internal memo reads.

Junior staff will get two extra days off every year under the new policy.

AM City has contacted Goldman Sachs for comment.

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Denver High School Teacher Is On Paid Administrative Leave After Participating In Protest With Students https://satgtu.org/denver-high-school-teacher-is-on-paid-administrative-leave-after-participating-in-protest-with-students/ Fri, 13 May 2022 23:56:26 +0000 https://satgtu.org/denver-high-school-teacher-is-on-paid-administrative-leave-after-participating-in-protest-with-students/ I-70 Things: The Instagram account built on frustration and rage, aims for changeAn Instagram account that started as a way to vent frustration over traffic conditions on Interstate 70 is now evolving to also include a hope for change. 4 hours ago Colorado lawmakers crack down on employers who steal workers’ wages: ‘We’re going to […]]]>

I-70 Things: The Instagram account built on frustration and rage, aims for changeAn Instagram account that started as a way to vent frustration over traffic conditions on Interstate 70 is now evolving to also include a hope for change.

Colorado lawmakers crack down on employers who steal workers’ wages: ‘We’re going to go after every company that does this’Some Colorado employers are stealing their workers’ wages, and new research shows it’s hurting us all. The Colorado Fiscal Institute says workers here lost nearly $730 million last year to wage theft. During that time, the state lost about $45 million in tax revenue for roads, schools, and other public services.

A first law of its kind could entrust federal experts with the oversight of digital platformsSenator Michael Bennet introduced a bill on Thursday that would focus on creating a commission to oversee big tech.

The state wants to set up a program to give financial incentives to replace lawnsThe bill would be for anyone who wants to convert their grass into a more water-sustainable landscape.

Aurora wants to ban grass in new developments to help conserve waterThis includes lawns, greenways and even water fountains.

A Denver high school teacher is on paid administrative leave after participating in a protest with studentsA large crowd of North High students staged a strike in support of Tim Hernandez after the district decided not to renew his contract.

The danger of wind and fire persists this weekendWatch Lauren Whitney’s predictions

New evacuations in Teller County as wildfire continues to burnThe fire broke out Thursday afternoon.

A Denver man has been charged with killing his brotherThe victims’ widow does not want the accused man released from prison.

Broncos wide receiver Jerry Jeudy’s girlfriend calls for case against him to be dismissedThe girlfriend of Denver Broncos wide receiver Jerry Jeudy on Friday asked a judge to dismiss a misdemeanor case against him stemming from a dispute between them.

Shortened ski season: Breckenridge closed on SundaysWarmer than normal temperatures are impacting Colorado’s ski industry this month.

1 dies in fire that destroys 8 mobile homes in ColoradoOne person has died in a fire that destroyed eight mobile homes in Colorado Springs.

The City of Boulder County doesn’t know how much money it will be responsible for clearing Marshall fire debrisSuperior city administrators wonder why Boulder County won’t tell them how much each part of the Marshall Fire debris removal process will cost.

Denver Zoo Holds First AAPI+ Festival in Honor of Asian and Pacific American Heritage MonthThe two-day festival will take place May 14-15 and is included with general admission.

Denver Police Need Help Identifying Man Suspected of Unlawful Sexual InterferenceThe crime happened on May 6 around 8:40 a.m. on East 48th Avenue and North Steele.

Ross McPherson, suspected of stabbing Lakewood doctor, under arrestIn video released by the department, a man police say is Ross McPherson can be seen moments before he stabbed a doctor in his office last week.

Citizens of Aurora arrest suspected bike thief and hold him until police arriveAurora police commend a community for working together to arrest a bike thief.

Nice weekend ahead but, we still need waterWatch Dave Aguilera’s predictions

Crime Spree suspect Trenton Dunham charged with shooting at police is set to appear in court for the first timeA 25-year-old man suspected of committing a series of crimes on Thursday is due to appear in court for the first time on Friday afternoon.

Boats allowed on Cherry Creek Reservoir again, search for missing man continuesThe search for a man who went underwater at Cherry Creek Reservoir last weekend is not over, but boating is once again allowed on the reservoir.

Broncos wide receiver Jerry Jeudy’s girlfriend calls for case against him to be dismissedDenver Broncos wide receiver Jerry Jeudy’s girlfriend says she wants a misdemeanor case against him stemming from a domestic dispute thrown out.

Video shows bear stuck in truck in LarkspurA rope was attached to the door handle so that it could be opened from a safe distance to release the bear.

Breckenridge shortens its ski season due to melting snowBreckenridge will close on Sunday, May 15, two weeks earlier than planned.

‘John Doe’ is no more: The suspect who the sheriff’s office says was identified completely non-verballyA suspect in a trespassing case that Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office officials thought was completely non-verbal turned out not to be, and now he’s been identified.

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Shortage of infant formula is hurting parents at the worst possible time https://satgtu.org/shortage-of-infant-formula-is-hurting-parents-at-the-worst-possible-time/ Thu, 12 May 2022 13:39:11 +0000 https://satgtu.org/shortage-of-infant-formula-is-hurting-parents-at-the-worst-possible-time/ Placeholder while loading article actions Maria Murillo had planned to breastfeed her baby. He was born early, at 38 weeks, because the amniotic fluid that kept him alive was so low. “I strongly believe that my body could have produced milk or kept Caleb alive,” she said. “He couldn’t do both.” After two and a […]]]>
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Maria Murillo had planned to breastfeed her baby. He was born early, at 38 weeks, because the amniotic fluid that kept him alive was so low. “I strongly believe that my body could have produced milk or kept Caleb alive,” she said. “He couldn’t do both.”

After two and a half months of trying to breastfeed and a long search for a formula that didn’t irritate Caleb’s stomach, Murillo and her husband now face a daunting new task: trying to find enough Similac Pro formula. -Total Comfort to keep their hungry 5 month old boy fed. It’s not on shelves in and around Rockville, Md., where she lives; it’s not online. Murillo turned to Facebook Marketplace and “found a woman who stocked it in New York. I bought 40 bottles from her. Knowing Caleb would go through this quickly, she bought more from a stranger in Tennessee. She and her husband reached out to family and friends across the United States, asking them to research the formula as well.

“It just brings me back to that dark place where I felt so inadequate,” Murillo said, tearing up. “My job as a mum is to feed him, and I couldn’t. And now we’re back to that place where we can’t get him formula.

Pandemic-related supply chain issues and a February recall by manufacturer Abbott, which makes Similac and other brands of formulas, led to dwindling inventory on the shelves for months. Last week, the supply of infant formula across the country was 43% below normal.

The shortage of infant formula in the United States worries parents. Here’s what you need to know.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 1 in 4 parents exclusively breastfeed their babies until they are 6 months old, which means most babies are at least partially fed formula. For many infants, formula is their only source of food. The empty shelves struck terror and despair among parents, who had to travel miles, pay exorbitant prices and seek help from online community groups.

Many parents feel abandoned — there are senators who did not know their constituents’ babies had no food until a reporter asked for it – at a time of enormous pressure and little support. Women are invited tojust breastfeedas if there was a switch to turn on the milk. Alongside the regular indignities of parents in the United States, where there is no mandatory paid leave and child care is out of reach, recent events have provided new ones: there is still no no coronavirus vaccine for children under 5, and new laws restricting abortion could threaten the treatment of miscarriage.

A shortage of formula milk is heavy for many mothers, in part because breastfeeding is heavy. Many mothers want to breastfeed, or feel obligated to breastfeed, or feel that they are not “mother” enough if they don’t breastfeed. But there are plenty of reasons why that doesn’t work, including a society that doesn’t give mothers enough time at home after birth before returning to work. The needle has moved a bit from “Breast is better” to “Fed is better”, but neither of those mundane sayings, now that this formula isn’t readily available. , is not easy.

“You have huge responsibilities that come with being a new parent, and now you have the inability to feed your child,” Murillo said. “It just seems like it’s all piling up.”

What It’s Like To Have A Baby In States Most Likely To Ban Abortion

For Jamie Lee Marks, “it looks like a coordinated attack” on new parents.

Marks gave birth under a mask during the pandemic. She didn’t have paid leave because her son was born in late August instead of October 1, the one-year mark that would allow the leave to go into effect at the federal agency where she worked. Instead, she used most of her sick leave to stay home with her newborn baby for 12 weeks. And then Marks quit her job for another, because she was so angry.

Now, despite driving 40 minutes each way so she and her husband could put their son in a small, safe daycare center, her son has been sick on and off for seven weeks since people stopped wearing masks in public, Marks said. She now hopes she won’t have to return to the office until he is vaccinated. Her son is now 20 months old and he no longer has the formula he needed to survive. She donates her leftover unopened cans to anyone who can use them. “I can’t imagine” adding a shortage of formula on top of everything, she said. “I feel like parents [of children] the under 5s have been forgotten by all.

Mac Jaehnert’s daughter, MacKenzie, was born just six months after his wife’s pregnancy. She was airlifted from their home in eastern Washington to Seattle, where she remained in the NICU for four months. MacKenzie could only have one type of formula when she returned home on March 21, and she was nowhere to be found. “Last week, I visited six grocery stores in one day,” Jaehnert said. “You shouldn’t have to play the game of basically calling every store like you’re trying to get a new PS5, when you’re just trying to get food for your kid.”

Jaehnert and his wife spent hours looking for formula in Seattle, where their daughter always has dates. His wife is on a Facebook page for local moms, and she received formula donations from another parent whose child was transitioning to solid foods. They also recruited family members from other parts of the country to search for him. Jaehnert’s father recently showed up with a Mother’s Day gift: six boxes of Neosure formula he brought from Milwaukee.

“We have this kind of medically fragile child,” he said. “And I spent more of my paternity leave than I care to think about running around the shops looking for formula milk, rather than spending time with my child. My wife feels guilty for not being able to breastfeed and provide for our child. This is a very emotional question for us.

Murillo said she was still “luckier than most”. She has a friend who only had three weeks off after the birth of her baby, but Murillo was able to get five months and one week off from her full-time job as chief paralegal. And yet, she still feels like she’s not doing enough. “Some people choose to give formula milk right off the bat. It wasn’t what I wanted,” Murillo said. “You have these dark thoughts that you’re a bad parent. And now you fail him again.

Amy Mello tried to help her sister find formula milk where she lives in North Texas. Mello is due to have her second child “any day” and also realizes she might be in trouble. Her first son, now 3, had severe allergies and needed the Puramino formula. She recently looked online to see if he was available in case her second child had the same needs, but he’s sold out. She found four cans on a resale site for $500. (It’s usually about $45 per container.) Depending on the baby’s age, this will last two to three weeks.

After raising their first child in a pandemic, “we waited to have another one, and we thought things were getting back to normal. And now it’s like we really don’t have any formula,” Mello said. “I don’t remember there being problem after problem when my mother had children. It’s not like there’s any better support from the rest of the country – no parental leave or anything. But at least they had no shortage of formula.

Mello said she has friends who say they don’t want to have kids at all. “I’m just as good, don’t do it unless you really want to,” she said. “Because parenthood is great, but the systems in place to help raise the kids currently feel broken, making it even harder for parents than it needs to be.”

Do you have a question about parenthood? Ask for La Poste.

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Man shot dead by Portland police remains hospitalized; a police team focused on gun violence now without a third of its officers https://satgtu.org/man-shot-dead-by-portland-police-remains-hospitalized-a-police-team-focused-on-gun-violence-now-without-a-third-of-its-officers/ Tue, 10 May 2022 01:37:00 +0000 https://satgtu.org/man-shot-dead-by-portland-police-remains-hospitalized-a-police-team-focused-on-gun-violence-now-without-a-third-of-its-officers/ A man shot by members of the Portland Gun Violence Team over the weekend remained hospitalized Monday in critical condition as police supervisors try to figure out how to continue the unit’s work with a third of its agents now on paid leave. Police stopped a silver Lexus for a suspected traffic violation Friday night […]]]>

A man shot by members of the Portland Gun Violence Team over the weekend remained hospitalized Monday in critical condition as police supervisors try to figure out how to continue the unit’s work with a third of its agents now on paid leave.

Police stopped a silver Lexus for a suspected traffic violation Friday night in the Roseway neighborhood as it drove west along Northeast Mason Street between 78th and 79th Avenues, according to police and officials. testimonials.

At some point during the stop, a man in the car fired at a Targeted Intervention Team officer and the officer and three other team officers returned fire, according to police and residents of the region. More than a dozen shots were fired in the residential area, neighbors reported.

A woman said she grabbed her two cats and hid on her bathroom floor until the gunfire stopped. Another immediately next to where the shooting took place said she hid in her living room, away from her windows.

Soon, many residents who live near the intersection reported receiving text messages and phone calls, alerting them to police activity.

The four officers – Adi Ramic, a board member for 12 years; Michelle Petty, board member for five years; Whitney Anderson, board member for three years; and John Bartlett, a member of the bureau for five years – are now on leave, standard procedure after police shootings while criminal and internal investigations are underway.

This leaves the two sergeants and eight other officers on the team available for the entire city. The unit first took to the streets in January, after Portland recorded a record 92 homicides last year.

“We’re just going to have to make do, maybe realign our days off or something,” said Lt. Kenneth Duilio, a team supervisor. “We are very lucky that we did not have an officer seriously injured or killed.”

The Targeted Response Team recently extended its coverage hours from four days a week to five days.

The unit will need to adjust to a smaller team in the immediate future, police spokesman Lt. Nathan Sheppard said.

“We don’t have the people to replace the FIT officers right now,” he said.

Officers on paid leave are expected to be on leave until the completion of the criminal investigation and presentation to a grand jury for consideration.

“We hope this case can make its way through the grand jury process as soon as possible,” Sheppard said.

This will allow police “to get these officers back to work assuming, of course, that they have experienced the event on a personal level and feel ready to return to work”, and that a grand jury has not rendered no indictments against the officers. , he said.

Police have not publicly identified the man who was shot. Officers stand guard at the hospital and authorities expect to arrest and charge him upon his release, they said.

Police declined to say why the Targeted Response Team officer stopped the car. A nearby resident, Kyle Terry, said the car had no license plate.

Terry said he heard three bursts of gunfire. After the gunfire ended, Terry said he saw police take two women east on Mason Street. Both women were crying and Terry said he heard one ask, “Why didn’t he just put his hands up?”

Police said they seized a semi-automatic weapon. The man suspected of shooting an officer from inside the car suffered life-threatening injuries, they said, but did not describe the injuries.

At one point, paramedics from the Portland Fire & Rescue Bureau were called to the scene to check on an officer who a dispatcher believed might have been hit, according to audio from the dispatch.

Terry said he saw officers tending to an officer along the Mason Street sidewalk next to his home, near the corner of 79th Avenue. They took off the officer’s vest and shirt, then he suddenly got up and walked away, Terry said.

The officer was Ramic but he was not shot, police confirmed.

Mary Wiedeman, who lives on 79th Avenue, said she thought she heard about 20 gunshots.

“I grabbed my two cats and sat on my bathroom floor,” she said Monday. “I was terrified. It looked like he was back behind me, but I couldn’t really tell.

Wiedeman and other residents said they received text messages and phone calls alerting them to the police response at 9:42 p.m.

Cody Peterson, who lives at 78th and Mason Street, said he heard two bursts of gunfire and another family member heard police yell, “Drop the gun!” or “Don’t pick up the gun!” shortly after.

Peterson said police searched his properties and those of his neighbors later that night with flashlights to check if any of the bullets hit their house or car.

A boat and car parked in a driveway along Mason Street opposite where the Lexus pulled up appeared to have been hit by bullets. A proof sticker remained on the outside of the boat.

Residents of the neighborhood, which is several blocks west of 82nd Avenue and about a block north of Sandy Boulevard, said they sometimes heard gunshots from afar, but nothing like.

“They’re kind of in the distance,” Terry said. “So for this to happen here, it’s incredibly crazy.”

The Targeted Intervention Team was created amid record-breaking homicides in the city, the majority resulting from shootings.

It was created more than a year after the city council in 2020 cut funding to the police bureau’s gun violence reduction team amid calls for police reform and criticism that the team disproportionately targeted people of color. The office spent nearly a year trying to form the new team.

A community monitoring group was also created to monitor the work of the team. Its members, who were appointed by the mayor’s office, helped create a job description for officers and interviewed and helped select team members. The volunteer group meets weekly to hear updates from the team and their supervisors.

–Maxine Bernstein

Email mernstein@oregonian.com; 503-221-8212

Follow on Twitter @maxoregonian

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The “cure” for mom’s guilt? Affordable childcare, paid family leave and equal pay https://satgtu.org/the-cure-for-moms-guilt-affordable-childcare-paid-family-leave-and-equal-pay/ Fri, 06 May 2022 20:59:00 +0000 https://satgtu.org/the-cure-for-moms-guilt-affordable-childcare-paid-family-leave-and-equal-pay/ With humor and courage, the “Mom Guilt Is Not Your Fault” campaign draws attention to the burnout and exhaustion mothers face after two years of pandemic parenting. “We remain committed to pushing the country to value the unpaid care and domestic work that women do,” said Reshma Saujani. “Women’s unpaid work remains disproportionate and unpaid.” […]]]>

With humor and courage, the “Mom Guilt Is Not Your Fault” campaign draws attention to the burnout and exhaustion mothers face after two years of pandemic parenting.

“We remain committed to pushing the country to value the unpaid care and domestic work that women do,” said Reshma Saujani. “Women’s unpaid work remains disproportionate and unpaid.” (Instagram)

It’s Mother’s Day, which means it’s time for the annual performative ritual to show appreciation to moms. What’s even more infuriating is that mothers who are already feeling drained have to do even more emotional work showing their appreciation for the appreciation inflicted on them for just one day. Rather than giving flowers that wither or a treat that is quickly consumed, what most mothers really want is an underlying systemic change that benefits not just them, but their entire system. family.

Reshma Saujani’s initiative, Marshall Plan for Moms, a campaign by her nonprofit Girls Who Code, aims to do just that, not just for one day but for the whole year, and even more ideally, for years to come by influencing corporate policies and culture so that the “motherhood penalty” is erased and support is provided for issues surrounding motherhood such as childcare, invisible work and the resumption of employment due to the pandemic.

A campaign video released this weekend called “Mom Guilt Is Not Your Fault” highlights the benefits of implementing systemic change, which can include “time to breathe, pee in peace” and ” remember who you even are”.

I spoke to Saujani about the chronic disease plaguing women in the United States – mother’s guilt – and how we can find a cure.


Elline Lipkins: Things are different halfway through 2022 than they were at the end of 2020 when you wrote your op-ed urging President Biden to implement a Marshall Plan for moms— schools are open (even though summer is approaching) and children (except those under 5) can be vaccinated.

Have you seen a change in women returning to work? And, if so, does this change your call for payment to mothers?

Reshma Saujani: While pandemic stimulus checks were just part of the Marshall Plan for Moms, we remain committed to pushing the country to value the unpaid care and domestic work that women do. Women’s unpaid work remains excessive and unpaid. Data shows that two years after the pandemic, women’s economic recovery is still lagging behind, and a major driver of this is that women are still being asked to replace their paid work with unpaid work.

While we are still waiting for the government to grow its heart and bail out moms by extending the Child Tax Credit, providing paid time off and affordable child care, I am not holding my breath. Congress is broken and we need to find other ways to relieve moms.

Lipkin: Concretely, what are the persistent (and ongoing) crises that the pandemic has brought to light for mothers who work outside (or inside) the home? Why did we need a pandemic to draw attention to these inequalities? What issues are you worried about becoming complacent to the public again (childcare costs, racial inequity, etc.)?

Saujani: The pandemic has mostly revealed that our child care system is broken and has brought home something that should have been obvious, which is that moms can’t work without it. It’s a problem we’re not only more aware of, but it’s also gotten worse. Until we improve affordability, accessibility, quality, start paying our caregivers fairly, even outside of a pandemic context, women’s careers will continue to suffer.

We’ve also seen on a broader cultural level that in heterosexual two-parent households, we’re a long way from gender equality at home — we know it was mothers who connected kids to Zoom School, took conference calls from the bathroom or were forced to quit their jobs.

I think it took a pandemic to draw attention to these issues because for so long women have taken it. Now that the bottom has fallen, we must fight to keep these issues at the forefront of the conversation and demand change.

It was the mothers who connected children to school Zoom, took conference calls from the toilet or were forced out of their jobs. it took a pandemic to draw attention to these issues because for so long women just took it.

Lipkin: You are busy fundraising for your organization. Where do you think is the best leverage for the dollars spent? Put pressure on the government? Or in the corporate world?

Saujani: The opportunity that I see, and that we are investing in, is to organize the private sector around expanding childcare benefits, providing gender-neutral paid leave (and making sure men take it). ) and removing the maternity penalty. We are at a unique moment where the incentives are truly aligned. Women, especially mothers, are leading the Great Resignation, and employers who want to win the war for talent, who want to attract, retain and advance women in their organizations must act. We’re not appealing to the goodness of their hearts here, it’s about the outcome.

At the same time, we’re going to continue to join our allies who are fighting in Washington, because these things shouldn’t be an “either/or” – it’s an “either/and”.

Lipkin: As I’m sure you’ve seen with Girls Who Code, there is still a reactionary pushback towards programming that serves girls and women. How do you respond to criticism that this program doesn’t accommodate single dads or same-sex couples? Or women who sacrificed themselves to care for the elderly but who are not mothers?

Saujani: We need to look at who is disproportionately affected by some of these things – and in this case, it’s moms. Recent employment figures show that men have recouped all of their labor losses since the pandemic, while women are still down.

Women are disproportionately affected by childcare issues – they make up 75% of primary caregivers. And it is the mothers who face a pay gap. We have a maternity penalty, men have a paternity bonus. Therefore, the issue we need to address is not just one of gender or even caregiving status, because when men do caring work, they are praised, respected and compensated. The problem we solve is discrimination against mothers.

Lipkin: Is the Marshall Plan for Moms only for moms whose work has been affected by the pandemic or meant to serve women who have chosen to be stay-at-home parents?

Saujani: The organization is dedicated to fighting for the policies that mothers need to thrive, which means all mothers. Our vision is to create a world where women have choices, where they can enter and exit the labor market over their lifetime without penalty and without judgment.

We have a maternity penalty, men have a paternity bonus – men do caring work, they are praised, respected and paid. The problem we solve is discrimination against mothers.

Lipkin: Your new book Pay pushes back against the (old saw) women can (or should even try to) ‘do it all’ blaming the exhortations of corporate feminism we lean into or push harder for critique and reform structural. What steps is the Marshall Plan for Moms taking to pressure the corporate world to embrace change and hold businesses accountable?

Saujani: Our approach to transforming workplaces is both top-down, bringing CEOs and business leaders together, and bottom-up, organizing moms to advocate in their organizations.

Lipkin: Your Mother’s Day campaign is wonderfully ironic and realistic! Yet, “mom guilt” can be interpreted in so many ways. I suppose most mothers, if they work for the economic survival of their family, don’t feel guilty about working, although they probably do whatever they need to do for their family, but there is no not have enough hours of the day to accomplish.

Do you think “mom guilt” is a social construct that serves capitalism? How can it be cropped?

Saujani:guilt” is the natural result of the clash of two completely inaccessible societal ideals: the perfect mother and the ideal worker. To get rid of mother’s guilt, we must not only change expectations about what these two things mean, but also provide the structural supports to facilitate motherhood, such as child care. Not just so we can go to work, but so we can go everywhere or do anything for ourselves.

Lipkin: How do you plan to involve partners, probably men, in this movement? The key, for me, seems to be getting their true buy-in rather than letting the women do the emotional work of teaching them why it’s important, managing their contributions, reminding them of their obligations to their families and this cause.

Saujani: I think role models are going to play a big part in that. Men aren’t going to start doing their part all of a sudden because they feel sorry for us and we asked nicely. They need to see that it is a success – even desirable! – man in our culture means doing school dropouts. There is also data. Men who take paternity leave are happier, have fewer health problems and better relationships with their children. They also have wives who earn more money. There is a win-win here.

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Startup pays staff $2,000 cash or $10,000 capital if they take vacation https://satgtu.org/startup-pays-staff-2000-cash-or-10000-capital-if-they-take-vacation/ Fri, 06 May 2022 19:30:11 +0000 https://satgtu.org/startup-pays-staff-2000-cash-or-10000-capital-if-they-take-vacation/ Toggle AI gives staff $2,000 in cash or $10,000 in stock if they take two weeks vacation. The startup introduced unlimited paid time off in 2022 and wants to ensure staff take vacations. Offering a paid incentive is one way to show the company means it, the Toggle co-founder told Insider. Loading Something is loading. […]]]>
  • Toggle AI gives staff $2,000 in cash or $10,000 in stock if they take two weeks vacation.
  • The startup introduced unlimited paid time off in 2022 and wants to ensure staff take vacations.
  • Offering a paid incentive is one way to show the company means it, the Toggle co-founder told Insider.

Amid record quitting rates, companies are scrambling to help their staff retire.

While some offer innovative perks like giving newcomers paid time off before they start, or greater influence in their workplace, one investing startup goes the extra mile when it comes to paid time off, offering workers $2,000 or $10,000 in capital if they take two weeks vacation.

It’s a way to ensure staff actually take their unlimited vacations, Giuseppe Sette, co-founder and president of artificial intelligence investment startup Toggle AI, told Insider.

Toggle AI, an online investment platform, officially introduced an unlimited paid vacation policy in February 2022, influenced by those launched at tech companies such as


netflix

.

However, while the perk is popular among employees, studies show that having unlimited paid time off may actually cause people to take fewer vacations, because they’re eager to prove their worth or don’t. do not feel confident with management, for example.

The founders wanted to avoid this “giant psychological trap,” Sette said. Incentivizing the perk is a way to clearly convey that founders really mean it when they say they want staff to take it, he added.

Staff receive $1,000 or $5,000 in capital for each week off

Toggle has offices in London, Tokyo and New York. The benefit is available to all 32 employees, who span roles in technology, marketing and science.

Staff receive $1,000 in cash and $5,000 in equity bonus for each week off. The only stipulation is that they must take a full week off, although they don’t have to take each week consecutively.

Although they can take as much paid leave as they wish, the bonus is capped at two weeks.

It’s about giving people choice, Sette said. Toggle’s founders all worked for financial firms in London and New York, where they saw the benefit of making furloughs mandatory. However, they didn’t want to force people to take time off, Sette said.

“It’s a message about the kind of culture we want to have – it’s a place where people work hard, but it’s also a place that takes care of a person,” Sette said. This then trickles down to how managers take care of their team members, he added.

“You can hire a new manager or invest in a nicer office anywhere else. But the truth is, when you do something special for people, they remember it,” he said.

Giuseppe Sette, co-founder of the online investment platform Toggle AI after a career in finance.

Giuseppe Sette, co-founder and president of Toggle AI.

Toggle AI


The company — which received $10.5 million in Series A funding in July 2021 — has budgeted for the cost and will be able to cover the overhead of the benefit for up to 1,000 employees, Sette said. .

Sette thinks staff, when given the choice, are more likely to take the equity ticket rather than the cash, as it could increase over time. Toggle AI staff members already receive a four-year vest when they join the company.

The holiday bonus initiative is part of a wider effort to help maintain a pleasant environment, so that they can enjoy lunches and get-togethers, for example.

It is still too early to gauge the impact of the benefit, which was introduced in February, although Sette said there has been a boost in morale. It also raised eyebrows among job seekers.

“It’s not enough to hire smart people – employers need to set them up to succeed,” Sette said – it means giving them benefits that matter, he added.

“Yeah, snacks are fine. Draft beer or beer on Fridays is fine, but it’s nice to have,” Sette said. “Parental leave or other things like vacations that matter. Create an environment where people can thrive.”

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